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Cluster index: Anthony Howell

The Indian Jungle.

A Fortnightly Review. The Indian Jungle: Psychoanalysis and Non-Western Civilizations by Sudhir Kakar. Karnac Books, 2o24 | 9781915565204 (paperback); 9781915565181 (e-book) | £19.99 Kakar Art Collective  ◊ By Anthony Howell.  rom the word go, Sudhir Kakar’s book on psychoanalysis and non-Western civilizations promises to be entertaining as well as enlightening. Initially he points out that […]

from ‘The Runiad’ book 7

< from Books 5 & 6               from Book 8 > A Fortnightly Serial. By ANTHONY HOWELL. ◊ ANTHONY HOWELL writes: My own romantic notion of myself has encouraged me to attempt an epic. It will have 24 books and be the same length as the Odyssey. Each book will […]

A Celebration of the Life and Music of John White.

Round Chapel, Hackney – 14 April 2024 By Anthony Howell. lue bells under the plane trees at the Round Chapel — John might well have composed a piece for them. Now that he is dead, we will never hear the sound that might be made by blue bells. Spring is in its first light leafage. […]

from ‘The Runiad’ books 5 & 6

< from Books 3 & 4   from Book 7 > A Fortnightly Serial. By ANTHONY HOWELL. ◊ ANTHONY HOWELL writes: My own romantic notion of myself has encouraged me to attempt an epic. It will have 24 books and be the same length as the Odyssey. Each book will be approximately 24 pages long, with […]

from ‘The Runiad’ books 3 & 4

< from Books 1 & 2                                                                                          from Books 5 & 6 […]

from ‘The Runiad’ books 1 & 2

from Books 3 & 4 > A Fortnightly Serial. By ANTHONY HOWELL. ◊ ANTHONY HOWELL writes: My own romantic notion of myself has encouraged me to attempt an epic. It will have 24 books and be the same length as the Odyssey. Each book will be approximately 24 pages long, with three seven-line verses per page. […]

A clutch of ingenious authors.

A Fortnightly Review Four Times EightyOne: Bespoke Stories by Michelene Wandor. Odd Volumes | 978-0999136591 | £15.95 ◊ Florilegia by Annabel Dover. MOIST Books | 978-1913430047 | £9.45 ◊ Abécédaire by Sharon Kivland. MOIST Books | 978-1-913430-10-8 | £11.95   By ANTHONY HOWELL. aving “found my stride” in the seventies, I am always interested in […]

Alan Jenkins at sea.

Anthony Howell: ‘Jenkins is a poet liberated (or sozzled) enough to allow the poem to follow its own music and conjure together phrases which project their melancholy magic.’

Jody Stewart’s momentary world.

Anthony Howell: ‘Stewart’s writing has been compared to that of Elizabeth Bishop, with justification. I am also reminded of the poems of Jean Garrigue…’

Thoughts on constitutional monarchs.

Anthony Howell: ‘From what I hear (I haven’t watched yet) the blessing of all religions and denominations has been expressly emphasised, which is a good idea. I like the idea of the monarch improving on Henry VIII’s title and rebranding himself as the ‘Protector of the Faiths’.’

Three Thai poems.

Anthony Howell: ‘Thin sugarless canebrakes raise their good-for-nothing plumes
Against the dawn, and in despite of noon, and to the night.’

Difficult poetry.

Anthony Howell: ‘Difficulty is nothing new. As F.T. Prince explains in his treatise on the Italian influence on English lyrical verse, poetry is not simply adroit use of sprezzatura – a quality cited by Baldassare Castiglione in his Book of the Courtier, where it is defined as “a certain nonchalance, so as to conceal all art and make whatever one does or says appear to be without effort and almost without any thought about it”.’

Odin at the well.

Anthony Howell: ‘Odin went to Mímir,
Eye to eye, the wisest of the wise.
The blind eye is sacred to Nelson
Turning a patch to the order,

Dreaming up an image of the world
That his one receptor projected.’

Plum Pudding Books.

Anthony Howell: ‘…ponder the garden of forking paths that a library may conjure up in the mind of a writer such as Borges.’

Martyrdom.

Anthony Howell: ‘With manipulation, the fault-lines can be re-opened, just as they were re-opened in Yugoslavia, where NATO capitalised on Croatia’s Ustasha (pro-Nazi) back-story and sponsored Muslim fanaticism.’