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Index: Poetry & Fiction

‘Recessional’ and other new poems.

Hoyt Rogers; Day can’t die, eyes / never close. But isn’t that the courage of language? To blind / by seeing, to deafen by saying, to divorce the world for words.

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Textuality.

Alan Wall: Tyndale ‘was on the side of the humble interpreters of the Bible’s teaching, against those who thought themselves supreme authorities. Hence his famous statement: ‘If God spare my life, ere many years I will cause a boy that driveth the plough shall know more of the scripture than thou dost.’ This was addressed to a theological opponent, one said to be learned, whose position in society was somewhat grander than following a plough. We all have the right to midrash; to that questioning of the original scripture, as long as it is driven by a fierce will to get to the truth. Pushed on by the ploughman’s shoulder.’

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‘The Art of Writing’ and other poems.

Alan Wall: ‘Charlemagne at forty taught himself to read
but never mastered writing:
all that fiddle and faff.
Carolingian script for his eye not his fingers.’

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Grandeur.

Andrew Jordan: ‘Mars as ever Mars must be; beyond shame, the warrior silent for years,
unresolved, his thoughts given as goods through passions imposed—
for the losses of gay kynges heaped, dishonoured pale, modern politics
within which poets variously comply, their material adjusted to please;
and all for a thumbs up on Facebook!’

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In close formation.

Peter Dent: ‘ my favourite side-

slip was the one about Thrace – whose music
not to mention its early poetry was the first port
of call for heavies supposing you needed same
(in those days you’d be considered odd if you
didn’t subsidiary clauses being brought in

overnight)…’

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Links from a forgotten chain.

Harry Guest: ‘…high language may
conceal discrepancies when colours leave,
shapes alter, former echoes don’t
even disturb the cobwebs…’

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‘After Argos…’

Kelvin Corcoran: So what are we doing now Potnia?
Do you see them at the foot of the hill
surrounding us, a flood, do you see them
through our transparent walls?

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Poems from ‘Changing’.

C’est la vie, mort de la Mort! –
and that was even finer than fine.
Poetry is a criticism of death

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Three poems by Anthony Costello

Anthony Costello (from ‘The Antique Hunter’): cabinets of Glost earthenware
and fine bone china,
recognizing a Stradivarius or 1st
of Ulysses when I see one

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Jon Thompson: Three new poems.

BIG WEATHER Low hum or high winds, hard to say. Outsideness looks cinematic, the world putting on airs with winter-stripped trees, gospel-swaying back & forth outside old-fashioned paned glass. Winter-sharp branches wave wildly, sough a song not their own. Wrens try out a call & response in the emptiness between boughs then wing away. What […]

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Three poems by Osip Mandelstam.

Osip Mandelstam: ‘Watch me grow stronger, then blind,
as I follow these humble roots.
What a park! My eyes come alive
now thunder is passing through.’

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Eight poems.

Iain Britton: ‘sunlight squints at distortions
trapped in tinted glass /
a ceremony breaks black bread
the wind creaks the floorboards /’

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Happiness Is the New Bedtime.

Becka Mara McKay: ‘I was living in a cliff-side hollow. I had no real friends. The local swallows tried to teach me to use mud to seal off the chinks and leaks in my dwelling. But they were creatures who could only eat on the wing, and I am a creature who can barely drink a glass of wine in a seated position without spilling it on my shirt, and so we could hardly find a common tongue, much less a way to understand each other’s tools and trademarks.’

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Three poems by Alain-Fournier.

Alain-Fournier: Firstly…no…well…in the evening…perhaps…
I will dare to take her hand, le petit pas;
If this takes too long, and the evening is fresh,
I will speak the truth until I’m out of breath,
And her eyes will be wet with words so tender
And with no-one overhearing, she will answer.

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Trois poèmes par Alain-Fournier.

Alain-Fournier: ‘…aux petits gars qui ne s’en vont avec personne
dans le cortège qui s’en va, fier et traîné
vers l’allégresse sans raison, là-bas, qui sonne.’

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