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Index: The 2013 Serial

Helen 3.

‘He had been the first to admire George’s work, and to urge him on to write; and all along he was his confidant, leading him on, the facile, imitative friend encouraging the slow, struggling man of original feelings. Then suddenly he deserted him, and George was alone, like some great sailing-ship left at the mouth of the harbor on its way out on a grey afternoon, lonely, rocking heavily. George, then, began his “Dieppe” again, leaving out the story of the restaurant-keeper.’

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Helen 2.

‘They had gone a few steps up the High Street when he noticed that her ungloved hand was hanging at her side close to his. He remembered how he had looked longingly at that hand nearly a month ago, when Helen stretched it out upon the table at her side as a preface to her invitation for that Saturday evening. She seemed to know what was in his mind, for she moved it nearer his. Their hands closed into one another—she had so much to tell him.’

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Helen. The 2013 Serial.

‘Oswald attended Cambridge, where he helped launch a weekly newspaper, the Cambridge Observer, chummed with Bertrand Russell (who read several of Oswald’s first stories), pursued women chastely and socialized on the margins of the Apostles, although he was never a member. His best friends were Russell, Lowes Dickinson, the composer Dalhousie Young, Eddie Marsh and especially Roger Fry, who became a close friend of the Sickert family, with whom he found companionship and lodging when his wife became mentally unstable, and who called Oswald “the most entirely beautiful character I have ever known.”‘

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